Supporting sound ecosystem management

Ecosystems, composed of water, land and biodiversity, function harmoniously to provide essential goods and services for life and livelihoods. The integrity and resilience of ecosystems and their components are fundamental for their functioning and sustainable productive cycles such as biological, hydrological and nutrient cycles. In West Asia, these dynamics take on unique characteristics, as the arid and semi arid nature of the region and its closed bodies of water make it host to wondrously diverse species that have adapted to the region’s unique landscapes, and as traditional governance arrangements were developed to maintain them throughout history. However, rapid changes on a global and regional level have led to indiscriminate and excessive exploitation of natural resources, which has had various consequences on the overall functioning of the region and its ecological, chemical and geological components. In the West Asia region, this is a result of oil industry and exploration, inadequate provisions for the rapid population growth, the erosion of traditional governance structures, migration and unsustainable consumption patterns. The consequences have been drastically depleted resources, water shortages, abandoned fertile land, and threatened biodiversity. These challenges are present across the globe but present themselves uniquely in the West Asia region, and hence require tailored and considerate approaches.

The UN Environment West Asia Office, Ecosystems Management subprogramme maintains a catalytic role, putting ecosystems at the heart of decision-making and planning. This is to ensure that the region’s usage of its resources is equitable and considers the benefits and vulnerabilities alike that derive from the natural environment. The subprogramme does so by emphasizing the region’s priority issues, facilitating relevant policies, aligning countries with international efforts, directing funding towards securing future wellbeing, and by highlighting approaches that are both equitable and profitable. In all of these functions, an integrated ecosystems management approach is crucial for harmonious outcomes. Stakeholder engagement and cross sectoral collaboration are central to this approach, as it aims to represent diverse interests across global, regional, and local levels. The region’s challenges are made far more complex by the precarious political and economic contexts in the region, yet it is these humanitarian crises that have revealed the urgency and extent of degradation and its impacts on the wellbeing of the regions’ inhabitants. Where livelihoods and security are fragile, bringing together humanitarian and environmental solutions is also crucial. With these values, the ecosystem management subprogramme in West Asia strives to deliver resilient, harmonious and sustainably thriving ecosystems. 

Ecosystems, composed of water, land and biodiversity, function harmoniously to provide essential goods and services for life and livelihoods. The integrity and resilience of ecosystems and their components are fundamental for their functioning and sustainable productive cycles such as biological, hydrological and nutrient cycles. In West Asia, these dynamics take on unique characteristics, as the arid and semi arid nature of the region and its closed bodies of water make it host to wondrously diverse species that have adapted to the region’s unique landscapes, and as traditional governance arrangements were developed to maintain them throughout history. However, rapid changes on a global and regional level have led to indiscriminate and excessive exploitation of natural resources, which has had various consequences on the overall functioning of the region and its ecological, chemical and geological components. In the West Asia region, this is a result of oil industry and exploration, inadequate provisions for the rapid population growth, the erosion of traditional governance structures, migration and unsustainable consumption patterns. The consequences have been drastically depleted resources, water shortages, abandoned fertile land, and threatened biodiversity. These challenges are present across the globe but present themselves uniquely in the West Asia region, and hence require tailored and considerate approaches.

The UN Environment West Asia Office, Ecosystems Management subprogramme maintains a catalytic role, putting ecosystems at the heart of decision-making and planning. This is to ensure that the region’s usage of its resources is equitable and considers the benefits and vulnerabilities alike that derive from the natural environment. The subprogramme does so by emphasizing the region’s priority issues, facilitating relevant policies, aligning countries with international efforts, directing funding towards securing future wellbeing, and by highlighting approaches that are both equitable and profitable. In all of these functions, an integrated ecosystems management approach is crucial for harmonious outcomes. Stakeholder engagement and cross sectoral collaboration are central to this approach, as it aims to represent diverse interests across global, regional, and local levels. The region’s challenges are made far more complex by the precarious political and economic contexts in the region, yet it is these humanitarian crises that have revealed the urgency and extent of degradation and its impacts on the wellbeing of the regions’ inhabitants. Where livelihoods and security are fragile, bringing together humanitarian and environmental solutions is also crucial. With these values, the ecosystem management subprogramme in West Asia strives to deliver resilient, harmonious and sustainably thriving ecosystems. 

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