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Factsheet Ecosystems
The Land-Based Sources of Marine Pollution (LBS) Protocol (signed in 1999 and adopted in 2010) and the Caribbean Regional Action Plan for Marine Litter (RAPMaLI) (developed in 2008 and updated in 2010) are regional frameworks for our marine litter projects and activities.
Policy and strategy
The purpose of this Memorandum of Understanding is to provide a framework of cooperation and facilitate collaboration between the Parties, on a non-exclusive basis, in areas of common concern and interest.

Categorized Under: Latin America and the Caribbean

Newsletter Ecosystems
Highlights this issue includes:- - Meeting of Contracting Parties to the Cartagena Convention and its Protocols - CARIMAM Workshop - Managing the Sargassum outbreak in the Wider Caribbean Region - Caribcoast - Arrival of 2 project officers at SPAW-RAC - Caribaea Initiative - Coral Restoration Consortium - Final year of the BEST 2.0 Programme
Factsheet
Plastics have become a valuable commodity and an important part of everyday life, more so that global plastic production has increased from 5 million tons in the 1950’s to over 250 million tons in 2006.But the high volume and the quality which makes this material so useful, is also harmful for the environment , especially our marine environment.

Categorized Under: Latin America and the Caribbean

Factsheet
Sustainable development of coastal and marine resources in the Wider Caribbean Region through effective, integrated management that allows for economic growth & sustainable livelihoods.

Categorized Under: Latin America and the Caribbean

Factsheet
The LBS Protocol, which was adopted in 1999 and entered into force in 2010, is one of three Protocols of the Cartagena Convention. This legal instrument consists of obligations to reduce the negative environmental and human health impacts of land-based pollution in the Wider Caribbean Region (WCR).
Factsheet Water
Approximately 15% of the Caribbean’s coral reefs are currently threatened by marine sources of pollution such as wastewater discharge from ships. Sewage runoff causes serious damage to coral reefs because it stimulates the growth of aquatic plants and algae which threatens marine life.
Factsheet
Solid waste is any persistent, manufactured or processed solid material that is discarded or left abandoned. Such material that is not disposed of properly has the potential to negatively impact the Caribbean Sea.
Factsheet
Oil pollution has been shown to have detrimental effects, both physically and chemically, on a wide range of marine life. Coastal and Marine Environments can take several decades to recover from oil pollution.
Factsheet
What can I do? What can we do? How can we reduce marine litter?
Pollution, including marine litter, plastics, sewage, oil and chemicals, impacts the value of the goods and services provided by the oceans, including quality of fisheries and the pristine marine environment highly valued by the tourism sector.
Newsletter Ecosystems
Highlights in this issue include - Recommendations of the 8th SPAW STAC; launch of the CARI’MAM project; GCFI Session (5 - 9 November 2018); Coral Restoration Consortium, Managing the Sargassum outbreak in the Caribbean; Summary of Anguilla Workshop (4 - 7 February 2019); Honduras is our 17th Contracting Party; SPAW-RAC’s new location; Introducing new SPAW RAC colleagues  
Newsletter Ecosystems
Highlights in this issue include:- 2018 Year in Review Safeguarding World Heritage Marine Sites from Marine Pollution Honduras becomes the 26th Country to ratify the Cartagena Convention Highlights From the Regional Activity Centres for the Pollution Protocol Global Environmental Facility Projects
Factsheet Oceans & seas
Sargassum fact sheet No.1
Sargassum is brown algae which originate in the Sargasso Sea of the Western Atlantic Ocean. It grows up to several meters and can float in the open ocean.
Factsheet Oceans & seas
Sargassum fact sheet
Massive quantities of pelagic sargassum occurred throughout the Caribbean in 2011, impacting aquatic resources, fisheries, shorelines, waterways, and tourism. Similar events have occurred since then, with a particularly heavy influx of sargassum observed during 2015.
Factsheet Oceans & seas
CEP Sargassum
Brown algae of Sargassum genus form dense populations constituting free floating rafts on the ocean surface. These sargassum rafts have been observed for a long time in the northern Caribbean Basin and the Atlantic ocean, and their presence has notably given its name to the Sargasso Sea in the North Atlantic Ocean.
Report Ecosystems
Guidlines for Marine Mammal Watching in the Wider Caribbean Region
The people of the Wider Caribbean Region (WCR) depend greatly on coastal and marine resources for their economic, social and cultural well-being. One of the region’s major economic activities-tourism is dependent on these resources and, therefore, it is critical that it be developed and carried out in a responsible and sustainable manner.
Report Ecosystems
Final Act Resolutions 1990
The Conference of Plenipotentiaries on Specially Protected Areas and Wildlife in the Wider Caribbean Region was convened by the Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) in pursuance of Decision No.18 of the Fourth Intergovernmental Meeting on the Action Plan for the Caribbean Environment Programme (Guadeloupe, 26-28 October 1987)
Factsheet Ecosystems
MMAP Factsheet
The Specially Protected Areas and Wildlife (SPAW) Protocol, born out of the Convention for the Protection and Development of the Marine Environment of the Wider Caribbean Region (Cartagena Convention), came into force in 2000 and is the only regional biodiversity legal agreement for the advancement of the conservation and protection of the marine environment in the Wider Caribbean Region (WCR).
Report Ecosystems
SPAW Final Act Resolutions Document
The Conference of Plenipotentiaries for the Adoption of the Annexes to the Protocol Concerning Specially Protected Areas and Wildlife (SPAW) in the Wider Caribbean Region was convened by the Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) in pursuance of Article 26 of this Protocol and the Resolution of the Conference of Plenipotentiaries on Specially Protected Areas and W

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